I Tatti Studies Call for Papers

   

Muslims and Islam in the early modern Italian and Mediterranean Worlds

I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance is pleased to announce a call for articles that explore the presence of "Muslims and Islam in the early modern Italian and Mediterranean Worlds."  Articles should address the transmission and circulation of ideas, objects, and people during the Renaissance, into and beyond the Italian peninsula. We are especially interested in essays that challenge current disciplinary boundaries while providing new interpretations of and evidence for cross-cultural interactions between Muslims and other religious and ethnic groups. Essays should be between 7000-9000 words, including footnotes.  The deadline for submission is January 31, 2014; selected essays will appear in the May 2015 issue of I Tatti Studies.

The journal will continue to consider and encourage submissions of individual essays exploring any aspect of the Italian Renaissance. I Tatti Studies maintains a double-blind review process and commits to reviewing essays within six months. For author information and for online submission, please click here. For other inquiries, please email Prof. Jane Tylus at jane.tylus[at]nyu.edu.

Volume 16 (2013) of I Tatti Studies will appear this November, and all individual members of the Renaissance Society of America will recieve free online access. It opens with four "state of the field" essays by senior scholars in theatre, women's studies, art history, and social history, and features clusters on the experience of the Renaissance street, Latinity and the vernacular, and the material culture of the Italian signori. See the table of contents below for more details.

VOLUME 16 TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

A New I Tatti Studies
            Jane Tylus, General Editor (New York University)

"STATE OF THE FIELD" ESSAYS

 1. Italy in the No Longer Forgotten Centuries
          Edward Muir (Northwestern University)
 
2. Women on the Move: Trends in Anglophone Studies of Women in the Italian Renaissance       
            Diana Robin  (Newberry Library)

3. Il made in Italy sul teatro rinascimentale: una nuova frontiera culturale
            Marzia Pieri (Università di Siena)

4.  Towards an Art History of Spanish Italy
            Michael Cole (Columbia University)
 

CLUSTER 1: THE EXPERIENCE OF THE STREET  IN EARLY MODERN ITALY

1. Introduction: Experiences of the Street in Early Modern Italy
            Georgia Clarke (Courtauld Institute of Art, London) and Fabrizio Nevola (University of Exeter)

2. The Republic of Sound: Listening to Florence at the Threshold of the Renaissance
            Niall Atkinson (University of Chicago)

3.  Surveillance and Control of the Street in Renaissance Italy
            Fabrizio Nevola (University of Exeter)

4. “ … Fanno bandire, notificare, et expressamente comandare … ”: Town Criers and the Information Economy of Renaissance Florence
            Stephen J. Milner (University of Manchester)

5. Rituals of Justice and the Construction of Space in Sixteenth-Century Rome
            Guido Rebecchini (Courtauld Institute of Art, London)

6.  Owning the Corner: The 'Powers' of Florence and the Question of Agency
            David Rosenthal (University of Bath)

7.  The Emperor’s Hat: City, Space, and Identity in Contemporary Accounts of Charles V’s Entry into Bologna in 1529         
            Georgia Clarke (Courtauld Institute of Art, London)

8.   Creations & Recreations: Contexts for the Experience of the Renaissance Street
            Nicholas Terpstra (University of Toronto)

CLUSTER 2: LATIN AND VERNACULAR IN QUATTROCENTO FLORENCE AND BEYOND

1. Latin and Vernacular in Quattrocento Florence and Beyond: An Introduction
            Andrea Rizzi (University of Melbourne) and Eva Del Soldato (University of Warwick)

2. Leonardo Bruni and the Shimmering Facets of Languages in Early Quattrocento Florence
            Andrea Rizzi  (University of Melbourne)

3. This Sort of Men’: the Vernacular and the Humanist Movement in Fifteenth-Century Florence
            Brian Jeffrey Maxson (East Tennessee State University)

4. Dominion of the Ear: Singing the Vernacular in Piazza San Martino
            Blake Wilson (Dickinson College)

5. Passing on Secrets: Interactions between Latin and Vernacular Medicine in Medieval Europe
            Elizabeth Mellyn (University of New Hampshire)

6.  "'Aristotile in parlare materno': Vernacular Readings of the Ethics in the Quattrocento
            Eugenio Refini (University of Warwick)

7. The Elitist Vernacular of Francesco Cattani da Diacceto and its Afterlife
            Eva Del Soldato (University of Warwick)
 

CLUSTER 3: MATERIAL CULTURE OF THE ITALIAN SIGNORI

1. Introduction: Lordship Reified
            Areli Marina (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

2. The Langobard Revival of Matteo il Magno Visconti, Lord of Milan
            Areli Marina (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

3.  Lorenzo de Medici’s Magnificent Cups: Vessels as Status Symbols in Fifteenth-Century Europe
           Eva Helfenstein (The Walters Art Museum)

4. Brilliant Bodies: Material Culture and the Adornment of Men in North Italy’s Quattrocento Courts
          Timothy McCall (Villanova University)

5. Lords and Monsters: Visible Emblems of Rule
          Touba Ghadessi (Wheaton College)