Publications

2016
A Translator's Defense
Manetti, Giannozzo. 2016. A Translator's Defense. Harvard University Press.
Everyday Renaissances: The Quest for Cultural Legitimacy in Venice
Ross, Sarah Gwyneth. 2016. Everyday Renaissances: The Quest for Cultural Legitimacy in Venice.
2015
The Prince's Body: Duke Vincenzo Gonzaga and Renaissance Medicine
Finucci, Valeria. 2015. The Prince's Body: Duke Vincenzo Gonzaga and Renaissance Medicine. Harvard University Press, 288.
Apologetic Writings
Savonarola, Girolamo, and M. Michèle Mulchahey. 2015. Apologetic Writings. Harvard University Press.
On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 1: Mystical Theology and The Divine Names, Part I
Ficino, Marsilio. 2015. On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 1: Mystical Theology and The Divine Names, Part I. Edited by Michael JB Allen. Harvard University Press.
On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 2: The Divine Names, Part II
Ficino, Marsilio. 2015. On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 2: The Divine Names, Part II. Edited by Michael JB Allen. Harvard University Press.
Daughters of Alchemy. Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy
Ray, Meredith K. 2015. Daughters of Alchemy. Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy. Harvard University Press, 280.Abstract

The era of the Scientific Revolution has long been epitomized by Galileo. Yet many women were at its vanguard, deeply invested in empirical culture. They experimented with medicine and practical alchemy at home, at court, and through collaborative networks of practitioners. In academies, salons, and correspondence, they debated cosmological discoveries; in their literary production, they used their knowledge of natural philosophy to argue for their intellectual equality to men.

Meredith Ray restores the work of these women to our understanding of early modern scientific culture. Her study begins with Caterina Sforza’s alchemical recipes; examines the sixteenth-century vogue for “books of secrets”; and looks at narratives of science in works by Moderata Fonte and Lucrezia Marinella. It concludes with Camilla Erculiani’s letters on natural philosophy and, finally, Margherita Sarrocchi’s defense of Galileo’s “Medicean” stars.

Combining literary and cultural analysis, Daughters of Alchemy contributes to the emerging scholarship on the variegated nature of scientific practice in the early modern era. Drawing on a range of under-studied material including new analyses of the Sarrocchi–Galileo correspondence and a previously unavailable manuscript of Sforza’s Experimenti, Ray’s book rethinks early modern science, properly reintroducing the integral and essential work of women.

The Bernard and Mary Berenson Collection of European Paintings at I Tatti
Strehlke, Carl Brandon, and Machtelt Brüggen Israëls. 2015. The Bernard and Mary Berenson Collection of European Paintings at I Tatti.Abstract

.The Bernard and Mary Berenson Collection of European Paintings at I Tatti surveys the 149 works assembled by the Berensons for their home in Florence from the late 1890s through the first decades of the twentieth century at the time that they were making their mark on the world as connoisseurs. The catalogue presents a privileged window on the Berensons' intellectual interests through the objects they owned. The entries, written by an international team of art historians, take full advantage of the extensive correspondence from the Berensons' friends, family, and colleagues at I Tatti as well as the couple's diaries and notations on the backs of their vast gathering of photographs. All the entries are lavishly illustrated with full scholarly and technical accountings of the objects. There are also 17 illustrated reconstructions of the original contexts of panel paintings. The catalogue includes essays on the progress of the Berensons' collecting, their love for Siena, the Sienese forger Icilio Federico Joni, the critic Roger Fry, and René Piot's murals at I Tatti, as well as a listing of 94 pictures that were once at I Tatti including donations made to museums in Europe and America.

For the complete index, click here.

The Medici: Citizens and Masters
Black, Robert, and John Law, ed. 2015. The Medici: Citizens and Masters.Abstract

The Medici controlled fifteenth-century Florence. Other Italian rulers treated Lorenzo the Magnificent (1449-1492) as an equal. To his close associates he was "the boss" ("master of the workshop"). But Lorenzo liked to say he was just another Florentine citizen. Were the Medici like the kings, princes and despots of contemporary Italy?  Or were they just powerful citizens? This book takes a novel, comparative approach.  It sets Medici rule against princely states such as Milan and Ferrara. It asks how much the Medici changed Florence and contrasts their supremacy with earlier Florentine regimes. The contributors take diverse angles, focusing on politics, political thought, social history, economic policy, religion, the church, humanism, intellectual history, Italian literature, theater, festivals, music, imagery, iconography, architecture, historiography, and marriage. This book is perfect for students of  History, Renaissance Studies, Italian Literature, Art History or anyone keen to learn about one of history's most colorful, influential and puzzling families

2014
Bernard Berenson: Formation and Heritage
Connors, Joseph, and Louis A Waldman, ed. 2014. Bernard Berenson: Formation and Heritage. Villa I Tatti, 440. TLS Review (Times Literary Supplement, 29 October 2014)
Political Writings
Salutati, Coluccio. 2014. Political Writings. Edited by Stefano U Baldassarri and Rolf Bagemihl. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 528.
Boninger, Lorenz, ed. 2014. Lorenzo di Francesco Guidetti, Ricordazione A. Rome: Edizioni di storia e letteratura, 207.
Mad Tuscans and Their Families: A History of Mental Disorder in Early Modern Italy
Mellyn, Elizabeth Walker. 2014. Mad Tuscans and Their Families: A History of Mental Disorder in Early Modern Italy. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 290.Abstract
Introduction: the tales madness tells -- Incapacity, guardianship, and the Tuscan family -- "Madness is punishment enough": the insanity defense -- Spending without measure: madness, money, and the marketplace -- From madness to sickness -- The curious case of forensic medicine: the dog that didn't bark in the night -- Conclusion.
Subverting Aristotle: Religion, History, and Philosophy in Early Modern Science
Martin, Craig. 2014. Subverting Aristotle: Religion, History, and Philosophy in Early Modern Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 262.Abstract
Scholasticism, appropriation, and censure -- Humanists' invectives and Aristotle's impiety -- Renaissance Aristotle, Renaissance Averroes -- Italian Aristotelianism after Pomponazzi -- Religious reform and the reassessment of Aristotelianism -- Learned anti-Aristoteliansim -- History, erudition, and Aristotle's past -- Pious novelty.
Albrecht Dürer nelle Fonti Italiane Antiche, 1508-1686
Fara, Giovanni Maria. 2014. Albrecht Dürer nelle Fonti Italiane Antiche, 1508-1686. Vol. 426. Firenze: L. S. Olschki, 426, 588.Abstract
"The core of this book is the catalogue of the Italian sources of Dürer's artwork; the chronological organization of the entries helps to trace a new image of Dürer as both a theorist of art and science, and a master engraver and painter, with results that substantially change our vision of his relationship with Italy. The volume also offers a first analytical index of Dürer's treatises kept in the Italian libraries"--Provided by publisher.
Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance
Palmer, Ada. 2014. Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance. Harvard University Press, 416.Abstract

This volume explores scholars’ use of Lucretius’ Epicurean didactic poem De Rerum Natura from its rediscovery in 1417 to 1600, focusing on the challenges its atomistic physics posed to Christian patterns of thought. In a period when atheism was often considered a sign of madness, the sudden availability of a sophisticated system that explained natural phenomena in non-theistic ways, and that argued powerfully against the immortality of the soul, the afterlife, and a creator God, threatened to supply the one weapon unbelief had lacked in the Middle Ages: good answers. At the same time, humanist scholars who idealized ancient Rome were eager to study a poem whose language and structure so often anticipated their beloved Aeneid. This book uncovers humanist methods for reconciling Christian and pagan philosophy, and shows how atomism and ideas of emergent order and natural selection, so critical to our current thinking, became situated in Europe’s intellectual landscape at the beginning of the scientific transformations of the seventeenth century. It employs a new quantitative method for analyzing marginalia in manuscripts and printed books, whose results expose how changes in scholarly reading practices over the course of the sixteenth century, fostered by the growth of printing, controlled the circulation of texts and gradually expanded Europe’s receptivity to radical science, setting the stage for the scientific revolution.

On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus
Zabarella, Jacopo. 2014. On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus. Edited by John P McCaskey. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 3 volumes.Abstract

On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus

Correspondence
Valla, Lorenzo, and Brendan Cook. 2014. Correspondence. Vol. 60. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 60, xxii, 417 pages.
The Battle of Lepanto
Lemons, Andrew, Sarah Spence, and Elizabeth R Wright, ed. 2014. The Battle of Lepanto. Vol. 61. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 61, xxiv, 527 pages.Abstract

I. Song of the Nereids / Carlo Malatesta -- II. On the treaty struck between the Christian leaders / Belisario Gadaldini -- III. Proteus / Cornelio Amalteo -- IV. [When nurturing Venus beholds the tragic ruin] / Marc Antonio Tritonio -- V. To those who died in the Holy War / Nicolo Paladino -- VI. [A city in mourning pays homage to Hector] / Alessandro Allegri -- VII. Hymn to Saint Mark and Saint Justina / Davide Podavini -- VIII. On Mustafa / Giovanni Canevari -- IX. [I am the moon; the fear of war has surrounded me] / Maffeo Galladei -- X. The council of the damned and Ali in despair / Giovanni Battista Oliva -- XI. On the painter portraying the same victory / Anonymous -- XII. On the action victory over the depraved fleet of Turks / Agostino Fortunio --XIII. To Sebastiano Venier, admiral of the Venetian fleet / Giovanni Battista Amalteo -- XIV. One hundred verses : to the city / Anonymous -- XV. [I will now sing of the happy deeds] / Anonymous -- XVI. Nautical eclogue, or The naval contest of the Christians and Turks / Giovanni Antonio Taglietti -- XVII. To the most reverend Paolo Odescalchi, Bishop of Penne and Atri / Giovanni Antonio Odescalchi -- XVIII. [The long-desired day at last dispelled the fading shadows] / Ottaviano Manini -- XIX. A shining song for the victor, John of Austria / Pompeo Arnolfini -- XX. The victory at Naupactus / Giovanni Baptista Arcucci -- XXI. Song on the victory of the Christian fleet / Guglielmo Moizio -- XXII. The song of John of Austria / Juan Latino -- Appendix I: Glossary of names and places -- Appendix II: Biographical information.

On Married Love, Eridanus
Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano. 2014. On Married Love, Eridanus. Edited by Luke Roman. Vol. 63. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 63, 385 pages.Abstract

Introduction -- On married love -- Eridanus -- Note on the text and translation -- Notes to the translation.

Pages