Past Events

  • 2017 Apr 20

    Thursday Seminar: What if Orfeo was an Automaton?

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    In 1616, Monteverdi told Alessandro Striggio that he couldn’t imitate winds because they are not human. “Ariadne moved us because she was a woman and similarly Orpheus because he was a man.” But what if Orpheus was not a man driven by his own internal passions and creative instincts but instead was an automaton—an inanimate machine with spontaneous motion and sound creation.

  • 2017 Apr 13

    Thursday Seminar: Boccaccio’s Giotto and Cavalcanti: Nature, Art, Knowledge

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm


    Until about 50 years ago, the prevailing account of Boccaccio’s Decameron was of an unreflective celebration of the natural, especially sexual, world, which in turn was said to play an equally unreflective role in the emergence of the kind of secularly based realistic representation whose history Auerbach sketches and celebrates in Mimesis.

  • 2017 Mar 23

    2017 Bernard Berenson Lectures on the Italian Renaissance: Lecture 3

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    Body Politics in the Italian and Spanish Renaissance
    Victor I. Stoichita, University of Fribourg 


    Lecture 3: Bodyguards.

    The final lecture considers armor during the High Renaissance as a double of the body, a kind of super-body, a simulacrum that is inhabited. 

  • 2017 Mar 20

    “Gombrich on the Pleasures and Perils of Circular Thinking”

    Location: 

    Istituto degli Innocenti, Sala Brunelleschi Piazza della Santissima Annunziata 50121 Firenze
    6:00pm


    The Renaissance is a historiographical fable of the nineteenth century. Twentieth-century art history was shaped by various forms of dissatisfaction with the patterns and priorities it imposed. Few scholars, however, grasped the unresolved tension within the concept of Renaissance between an affirmative unrest (rebirth, a beginning) and the promise of closure through integration (the classic, an endpoint).

  • 2017 Mar 16

    Thursday Seminar: Civic Religion?

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    A model of ‘Civic religion’, understood as municipal attempts to develop legitimacy through sacred language and devotional activities, is now widely used by historians of late medieval and renaissance Europe.

  • 2017 Feb 23

    Thursday Seminar: "Translating Sex: The Long History of the 'One-Sex' Body"

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    The contention that before the late eighteenth century learned opinion held that there was only one sex, famously proposed by Thomas Laqueur in Making Sex (1990), has achieved near-canonical status in the eyes of many historians and literary scholars.  In this seminar, Park will argue that this “one-sex” body was never hegemonic in Latin Europe and will propose an alternative narrative to describe evolving ideas of sex difference among European natural philosophers and medical men.

  • 2017 Feb 16

    2017 Bernard Berenson Lectures on the Italian Renaissance: Lecture 2

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    Body Politics in the Italian and Spanish Renaissance
    Victor I. Stoichita, University of Fribourg 

    This lecture series deals with the belief in the power of the gaze in Renaissance art and culture and with the impact of this belief on artistic representation. 

    Lecture 2: Faces and Shields

    The second lecture focuses on Renaissance portraits as settings of optical conflicts. If the portrait exhibits the person, how can it be protected? 

  • 2017 Jan 26

    2017 Bernard Berenson Lectures on the Italian Renaissance: Lecture 1

    Location: 

    Gould Hall
    6:00pm

    Body Politics in the Italian and Spanish Renaissance
    Victor I. Stoichita, University of Fribourg 

    This lecture series deals with the belief in the power of the gaze in Renaissance art and culture and with the impact of this belief on artistic representation. 

    Lecture 1: Giotto: the Eye and the Gaze.

    The first lecture – a prologue – explores the power of the gaze motif and its roots in the Arena Chapel in Padua. 

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