Conference Proceedings

The Medici: Citizens and Masters
Black, Robert, and John Law, ed. 2015. The Medici: Citizens and Masters. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The Medici controlled fifteenth-century Florence. Other Italian rulers treated Lorenzo the Magnificent (1449-1492) as an equal. To his close associates he was "the boss" ("master of the workshop"). But Lorenzo liked to say he was just another Florentine citizen. Were the Medici like the kings, princes and despots of contemporary Italy?  Or were they just powerful citizens? This book takes a novel, comparative approach.  It sets Medici rule against princely states such as Milan and Ferrara. It asks how much the Medici changed Florence and contrasts their supremacy with earlier Florentine regimes. The contributors take diverse angles, focusing on politics, political thought, social history, economic policy, religion, the church, humanism, intellectual history, Italian literature, theater, festivals, music, imagery, iconography, architecture, historiography, and marriage. This book is perfect for students of  History, Renaissance Studies, Italian Literature, Art History or anyone keen to learn about one of history's most colorful, influential and puzzling families

Gaston, Robert W., and Louis A. Waldman, ed. In Press. “San Lorenzo: A Florentine Church”.Abstract

This comprehensive, interdisciplinary monograph will deal with many aspects of the San Lorenzo basilica, extending from its foundation as Florence’s palaeochristian cathedral to the modern era. Florence's Basilica di San Lorenzo, the city’s first cathedral and the center of liturgical patronage of the Medici and their grand ducal successors from the late Trecento until the nineteenth century, is one of the most frequently studied churches in Florence. Modern studies have tended, however, to focus on limited and specific aspects of the complex, and the lion’s share of research published since the nineteenth century deals with the period from Brunelleschi to Michelangelo, or from Cosimo il Vecchio to Cosimo I. The San Lorenzo project has already produced a conference, held at I Tatti on 27-30 May 2009, and a series of sessions at the 2010 annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America. Energies are now focused on the monograph, with chapters that address a broad range of questions. These include the urban setting of the churches and the parish, San Lorenzo's relations with other ecclesiastical institutions, the individual buildings, the clergy, chapels and altars, the chapter's administration and financial structure, liturgical furnishings, music, liturgy, preaching, the demographics of parish life, and the annual or ephemeral festal practices on the site. Each chapter will offer an extensive exploration of its topic, wide-ranging in its historical scope and wherever possible dealing not merely with brief moments of history but with the longue durée. Each will include new research, the publication of relevant documents, and a careful critical assessment of the historiography.

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